This week’s blog is from Olivia Frost, a 23 year old Masters student studying Wildlife Filmmaking at the University of the West of England in Bristol, who shares the plans for her latest project: 

In a time when women were told that they couldn’t, or that they shouldn’t, one woman did…

All my life I’ve been extremely passionate about wildlife and conservation, gaining a First Class Undergraduate degree in Conservation Biology and then moving to Bristol to study and train as a Wildlife Filmmaker. I can attribute my love of wildlife to one woman in particular, who has inspired me since childhood – that woman is Beatrix Potter.

Filming initial footage for ‘The Lady of the Lakes’

Beatrix Potter is famous worldwide; almost everyone knows of her beautiful storybooks and delicate watercolours, but what most people sadly don’t realise is that Beatrix’s work far exceeded that which was captured on paper. A brave, bold, independent and forward-thinking woman, Beatrix Potter was also a key conservationist who defied the rigid conventions of her middle-class Victorian life in order to fight for and protect the beautiful Lake District landscapes which she loved.

As a result, for completion of my MA degree, I am in the process of making a short self-funded film called ‘The Lady of the Lakes’ which will be pitched and shown to members of the BBC’s Natural History Unit. This film will represent the life of the true Beatrix Potter, including exploration of her important relationship with nature, which enabled the protection of one of the UK’s most treasured landscapes.

The film will be a re-enactment documentary drama supported by factual information. It will showcase

Olivia’s hero, Beatrix Potter, as depicted in her film

the beauty of British landscapes and wildlife and will accurately represent some key Lake District traditions, such as the maintenance of the hardy and beautiful Herdwick sheep.

I am really hoping that my film will inspire others to become involved in conservation and to appreciate the beauty of Lake District landscapes, which only exist today because of the remarkable work that Beatrix Potter dedicated her life to. I want to tell people about the real Beatrix Potter – a woman who was far more than simply a creator of pretty drawings.

Conservationist and filmmaker Olivia Frost

I am also hoping to use my film as a tool to really empower and inspire young girls who are interested in science and conservation; Beatrix was forced to face many hurdles but ultimately persisted to follow her true passion, and made a real difference to the world because of it. In the same way, I believe young women should also be inspired to be strong and independent – everyone should be encouraged to follow their dreams.

As a result, I’m really trying to raise some support for my film. I am hoping to reach as many people as possible with my project and really need to raise the funds to cover the costs of making it, which included elements such as costumes, use of a drone operator, transport, accommodation, permissions costs and more. As a student, I already have a great many fees to pay, all of which I am paying for independently, so covering the costs of making a film in addition, which is required for completion of my degree, has been a challenge; therefore, I’d really appreciate any support you could offer me and my film, however big or small!

Beatrix’s life story is a tale worth telling and I hope her actions will continue to inspire others to engage with nature and conservation, for many years to come.

To find out more and to support the project, please click here: https://uwe.hubbub.net/p/theladyofthelakesfilm/pitch/

You can also follow the project on

Twitter: @tladyofthelakes  

Facebook: @theladyofthelakes  

Instagram: @theladyofthelakes

WordPress: https://theladyofthelakes.wordpress.com/

Dr Heather Williams
Heather helped establish ScienceGrrl in June 2012 and is ScienceGrrl's Director. Heather is a Senior Medical Physicist for Nuclear Medicine at Central Manchester University Hospitals and honorary Lecturer in the Centre for Imaging Sciences at Manchester University. She makes sure pictures of patients are top quality so the doctors can trust what they see, and tries out new and better ways of imaging the body’s functions. When she’s not working, Heather enjoys running, cycling and spending time with her sons.
Dr Heather Williams
Dr Heather Williams