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Edith Stoney – a medical physics pioneer

Edith Stoney – a medical physics pioneer

Last week I was honoured to be one of four medical physicists in the Science Council’s list of 100 leading UK practising scientists, designed to highlight the range of roles available to those working in science. 37% of medical physicists are women, a significant advance on female representation in many fields within physical science. But(…)

I’m an engineer because I want to change the world

I’m an engineer because I want to change the world

When I applied for my first engineering job, I lied. “Why did you want to become an Engineer?” asked the grey-haired-60-something man from across the boardroom table. I had prepared my answer, and launched into a generic spiel I’d heard repeated plenty of times before: “I’m fascinated by technology” I said … “was addicted to(…)

Christmas Prize Draw – and the winners are…

Christmas Prize Draw – and the winners are…

The Christmas Prize Draw closed at 6pm on Thursday 12th December, after which it was over to Jon Wood, Birmingham chapter lead, to tell us which of the 766 tickets belonged to 5 lucky winners. These were selected using a rather fabulous retro random number generator which bears a striking resemblance to the Sinclair ZX Spectrum of(…)

Brains: sex, society and #neurotrash

Brains: sex, society and #neurotrash

This is a guest post by Georgina Rippon, who is Professor of Cognitive Imaging and Pro-Vice Chancellor (International) at Aston University. Gina recently gave the ScienceGrrl Birmingham ‘Say NO to Neurotrash!’ lecture (video link). Find her on Twitter:  @springfield16. We watched the latest discussion on ‘male and female brains’ play out in the media with(…)

Christmas Prize Draw! Win one of 5 signed Brian Cox books

Christmas Prize Draw! Win one of 5 signed Brian Cox books

We’re working towards gender equality in the sciences, and are not at all surprised that there are lots of guys who care about that as well as girls. ScienceGrrl has lots of male supporters – and Prof Brian Cox is one of them. Brian kindly donated his time in October to deliver our inaugural ‘Because(…)

F1 for the girls!

F1 for the girls!

Peter Luff, MP sent ScienceGrrl a copy of the BBC Top Gear magazine article “So you want to work in F1?” – it was addressed to ‘schoolboys’. Worse, the associated graphic depicts an all-male F1 team – well, except for the female hospitality and media staff in short skirts. “Not helpful” he said, and we(…)

Setting up ScienceGrrl’s shop

Setting up ScienceGrrl’s shop

I’m Liz, I’m a Clinical Technologist at The Christie Hospital in Manchester by day and the Merchandiser for ScienceGrrl by night (also weekends). I have a BSc (Hons) in Physics with Medical Applications from The University of Liverpool and have been working as a technologist for almost a year. I love it, as proven by(…)

Speaking of – and for – Science

Just under a month ago we celebrated our first birthday. The party began on Thursday 10th October with a sold-out lecture on Particle Physics by Professor Brian Cox, introduced by Dr Heather Williams, and sponsored by the Ogden Trust.  That evening, 600 people (including over 200 school and college students) were treated to fascinating science(…)

Something to Say – a 1st birthday party with a difference…and Gia Milinovich

Something to Say – a 1st birthday party with a difference…and Gia Milinovich

18th October marks the first anniversary of our launch party. Our birthday celebrations begin on Thursday 10th October, with the inaugural ‘Because Science is for Everyone’ lecture by Dr Heather Williams and Professor Brian Cox in Manchester, and continue with our ‘birthday party with a difference’ on Saturday 12th October in London. On the afternoon of 12th October, Gia Milinovich will(…)

If you love [BLANK], then you’ll love my job

If you love [BLANK], then you’ll love my job

This is a guest post by Victoria Herridge (@ToriHerridge). She is one-quarter of Team TrowelBlazers, who celebrate women in archaeology, palaeontology & geology – past & present – and tweet at @trowelblazers. What would you say to fill in the blank in the title? What one word or phrase could possibly capture the essence of(…)

What do you see when you look in the mirror?

What do you see when you look in the mirror?

Back in July I was approached by Jaclyn Craig from the What I See project to ask for my involvement in their campaign on behalf of ScienceGrrl. She explained that they were bringing together women from all walks of life – creating a mosaic of self-expression, giving our unified voices power and inspiring connections with other(…)

Celebrate our first birthday – with Prof Brian Cox and Gia Milinovich

Celebrate our first birthday – with Prof Brian Cox and Gia Milinovich

18th October marks the first anniversary of our launch party, and we’re celebrating our first birthday in fine style with fantastic events in Manchester and London, generously supported by Professor Brian Cox and Gia Milinovich. Lecture by Prof Brian Cox Thursday 10th October, University Place, Manchester Prof Brian Cox will be giving our inaugural ‘Because Science is(…)

Lancashire Science Festival

Lancashire Science Festival

ScienceGrrl have been getting out and about and meeting and greeting at science festivals this summer – we kicked off with Lancashire Science Festival in June, a brilliantly full-on day which Abby Ickringill (R&D Chemist at F2 Chemicals) will remind us of in this guest blog post. We had a blast at Live from Jodrell(…)

Sound Science – get involved!

Sound Science – get involved!

ScienceGrrl is collaborating with education company now>press>play to create a series of science-themed educational adventures for children. We are teaming our scientists with their writers to create a unique and exciting experiences, and we need your help! If you would like to help create and deliver these experiences, please complete the form below by next(…)

Trowelblazing Role Models

Trowelblazing Role Models

This is a guest post by Suzanne Pilaar Birch, a postdoctoral fellow in archaeology at Brown University where her research focuses on human response to climate change in the past. She is one-fourth of the Trowelblazers team, who are working hard to make sure that the contributions of women in the fields of archaeology, geology,(…)

ScienceGrrl chapters – our expanding local networks

ScienceGrrl chapters – our expanding local networks

One evening over a glass of wine, a very lovely lady called Anna Zecharia came out with a very wonderful idea. “ScienceGrrl should have local gatherings. Chapters.” We didn’t need to discuss it, we recognised it for the stroke of genius it was. It went straight into the strategy. What I didn’t foresee is quite(…)

There’s no good reason to push pink toys on girls

There’s no good reason to push pink toys on girls

The royal family are set to be inundated with gifts once William and Kate’s child is born. But before buying presents, should people wait and see if the baby is a boy or a girl? Here is a guest blog post by Melissa Hines, Professor of Psychology, University of Cambridge, a specialist in child gender(…)

Women in the Workplace

Women in the Workplace

Today the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee published its report of the enquiry into Women in the Workplace, which drew on 103 written submissions, oral evidence from 46 witnesses, and many more responses to discussions on Woman’s Hour and Mumsnet. It’s a thorough report, and also a well-written and engaging read. However, those who live(…)

Being 8 years old, staying 8 years old….

Being 8 years old, staying 8 years old….

I love how even the lab’s solutions room can provoke a state of wonder in someone who has never set foot in a library of chemicals before. The -80C freezer also gets a good reaction. That’s before we’re anywhere near the electrophysiology rig and confocal microscope. Having the chance to open someone’s eyes to the(…)

TrowelBlazers: celebrating awesome trowel-wielding women

TrowelBlazers: celebrating awesome trowel-wielding women

It’s easy to imagine the academic world at the turn of the 20th Century, right? A world closed to all but the most privileged of men – whiskered gentlemen in stiff suits, pipe smoke and port, explorers with a whiff of pith helmet about them. Imagine, then, arriving on the island of Crete in 1904(…)