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Don’t shoot the messenger: the deeper problem behind the all-male Commons STC

In this piece we look at the reasons behind the all-male STC – and call for the Committee to take the opportunity to show leadership on equality, diversity & inclusion. On Monday 11th September, the House approved a motion to appoint an entirely male and predominantly white Science and Technology Select Committee (STC). This has(…)

“Well behaved women seldom make history” – Jess Wade reports back on #ICWIP2017

The International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP) is a triennial meeting that looks to “understand the severe under-representation of women worldwide and to develop strategies to increase their participation in physics”. The first was held in Paris in 2002 and 2017 marked its first return to Europe (while we’re still in Europe, I’m going(…)

Emma Schierbaum welcomes you to Baylab

New research finds that introverted students suffer disproportionately when it comes to practical science lessons in schools. Almost half of teachers consulted confirmed that introverted students were more likely to hold themselves back from taking part, rather than engage with hands-on experimentation, due to lack of equipment. Teachers said such students would continue to be(…)

100 Years of the Medical Women’s Federation: The Past, Present and Future

This week, we welcome Sarah McLoughlin of the Medical Women’s Federation, to tell us more about their work and events to mark their centenary next month: “Recently released stats by the GMC reveal that in 2017, 46% of registered doctors in the UK are now women and, with women also making up 55% of all(…)

Raising Dauntless Daughters

We’re tremendously excited to host this guest blog from Steph Green, founder of Dauntless Daughters. Steph lives in the West Midlands with her husband and two children, and believes the world would be a better place if we were surround by images and stories that showed our daughters how amazing women are. So she founded Dauntless Daughters, a(…)

Send #WomenInSTEM around the globe

To mark the UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we present <insert drum roll here> this guest blog from Alice Gray, science blogger, creator of Gray Matter and the driving force behind some limited edition goodies which are being sold in aid of ScienceGrrl: “You have brains in your head. You have feet(…)

8 Reasons Why Kids Should Science More [Infographic]

Teacher? Parent? Big kid? Michael Hervas of Psysci.co recently sent this nice infographic which we wanted to share with you. He says: “We firmly believe that children should be encouraged to learn about science and be involved with science as much as they possibly can be, even from an early age. And we believe this(…)

In for the long haul

This always happens. Someone somewhere makes a stand against something. A big, bold gesture that commands attention, that challenges the status quo. Fairly shortly after, we hear the question: “But what difference did it make?” So it was that this article appeared in this week’s Metro, questioning the impact of the women’s marches which occupied(…)

Reflections on #womensmarchlondon

 On Saturday 21 January 2017 – the day after Donald Trump became President of the United States – hundreds of thousands of people across the globe stood up for women’s rights and equality. Our @annazecharia was at the London march. The photos which accompany this post are by Louise Morris. Find her as @LouMorrisPhoto on(…)

‘Boss it!’ – ScienceGrrl at Kensington Town Hall

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea hold an annual two-week Celebration of Science, discussing everything from bird eggs to smart cities and high-performance sports. On their opening day seven ScienceGrrls descended – on a mission to ‘boss it’. In this guest post, Dr Jess Wade reports back on an eventful panel discussion: The celebrated Dr(…)

Hurrah for Hephzi!

Congratulations to skin biology researcher, ScienceGrrl member and ScienceGrrl Essex chapter lead Hephzi Tagoe, who was awarded with the New Researcher Prize by the Royal Society of Biology last week at an awards ceremony celebrating excellence in science communication. The award was given for her commitment to science communication, in particular her Shaping Healthy Attitudes and Protecting the(…)

Project FAB

ScienceGrrl sponsored a prize at this year’s Conference for Astronomy and Physics Students in Glasgow, for the best presentation about work towards improving inclusion and diversity in physics. The winner was Fraser Baird, who is working towards an MSc in Physics with Astrophysics, and also oversees Project FAB – an STFC-sponsored outreach initiative in primary schools. In(…)

So ‘Brexit means Brexit’ – so what next?

So ‘Brexit means Brexit’ – so what next?

Ahead of the UK referendum on membership of the European Union, scientists largely came out in support of voting to Remain in the EU. But, on 23rd June, those voting Leave secured a narrow majority. In recent weeks, UK government ministers have affirmed that ‘Brexit means Brexit‘ and ‘Brexit means leaving the European Union‘ but there(…)

Kicking the Elephant Out of the Room

Our network of ScienceGrrl members runs to over 400 nationwide. Where possible, we link our members with local chapters, headed up by enthusiastic chapter leads. Chapters provide opportunities for informal networking, peer support, and grass-roots activism and public engagement, often in partnership with local initiatives. This post is the first in a short series by Sarah Hughes, our(…)

Eleni Charalambous – a passion for science that keeps on growing

It’s British Science Week, and many of our members are busy sharing their love of science with the world, and particularly young people who are considering their strengths and abilities and beginning to decide of the type of career they may wish to pursue. It’s natural that those who are so enthusiastic about their scientific work will quietly  –(…)

UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2016

The United Nations designated 11th February the International Day of Women and Girls in Science. We joined with our colleagues all over the world via social media to celebrate, invited you to join in…and my word, you did! The hashtag associated with this initiative, #womeninSTEM, was trending as the second most popular topic on Twitter(…)

Tim Hunt – ScienceGrrl responds

For the last week, discussions around women in science in the UK have largely centred on remarks made on Monday 8th June by Sir Tim Hunt, at the World Conference of Science Journalism, as part of a speech he gave during a lunch sponsored by female Korean scientists and engineers: “Let me tell you my trouble with(…)