About Heather Williams

http://www.manchester.academia.edu/HeatherWilliams

Heather helped establish ScienceGrrl in June 2012 and is ScienceGrrl's Director. Heather is a Senior Medical Physicist for Nuclear Medicine at Central Manchester University Hospitals and honorary Lecturer in the Centre for Imaging Sciences at Manchester University. She makes sure pictures of patients are top quality so the doctors can trust what they see, and tries out new and better ways of imaging the body’s functions. When she’s not working, Heather enjoys running, cycling and spending time with her sons.

Posts by Heather Williams:

Tiring of Twenty

For the past 30 years, girls have made up only 20 % of physics A-Level classrooms. Women make up only 9 % of professional engineers and only 11 % of physics professors. Dr Jess Wade reports back with some new, and very good news, from the launch of the Improving Gender Balance report from the Institute of(…)

Send #WomenInSTEM around the globe

To mark the UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we present <insert drum roll here> this guest blog from Alice Gray, science blogger, creator of Gray Matter and the driving force behind some limited edition goodies which are being sold in aid of ScienceGrrl: “You have brains in your head. You have feet(…)

8 Reasons Why Kids Should Science More [Infographic]

Teacher? Parent? Big kid? Michael Hervas of Psysci.co recently sent this nice infographic which we wanted to share with you. He says: “We firmly believe that children should be encouraged to learn about science and be involved with science as much as they possibly can be, even from an early age. And we believe this(…)

In for the long haul

This always happens. Someone somewhere makes a stand against something. A big, bold gesture that commands attention, that challenges the status quo. Fairly shortly after, we hear the question: “But what difference did it make?” So it was that this article appeared in this week’s Metro, questioning the impact of the women’s marches which occupied(…)

‘Boss it!’ – ScienceGrrl at Kensington Town Hall

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea hold an annual two-week Celebration of Science, discussing everything from bird eggs to smart cities and high-performance sports. On their opening day seven ScienceGrrls descended – on a mission to ‘boss it’. In this guest post, Dr Jess Wade reports back on an eventful panel discussion: The celebrated Dr(…)

Hurrah for Hephzi!

Congratulations to skin biology researcher, ScienceGrrl member and ScienceGrrl Essex chapter lead Hephzi Tagoe, who was awarded with the New Researcher Prize by the Royal Society of Biology last week at an awards ceremony celebrating excellence in science communication. The award was given for her commitment to science communication, in particular her Shaping Healthy Attitudes and Protecting the(…)

Project FAB

ScienceGrrl sponsored a prize at this year’s Conference for Astronomy and Physics Students in Glasgow, for the best presentation about work towards improving inclusion and diversity in physics. The winner was Fraser Baird, who is working towards an MSc in Physics with Astrophysics, and also oversees Project FAB – an STFC-sponsored outreach initiative in primary schools. In(…)

So ‘Brexit means Brexit’ – so what next?

So ‘Brexit means Brexit’ – so what next?

Ahead of the UK referendum on membership of the European Union, scientists largely came out in support of voting to Remain in the EU. But, on 23rd June, those voting Leave secured a narrow majority. In recent weeks, UK government ministers have affirmed that ‘Brexit means Brexit‘ and ‘Brexit means leaving the European Union‘ but there(…)

Lancashire Science Festival – Draw a Scientist

For the last 4 years, ScienceGrrl has been delighted to participate in Lancashire Science Festival at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) in Preston. The festival comprises talks, shows, and a packed show floor of exhibitors who showcase science to local school children over two days, and then to over 10,000 members of the public(…)

What does a physicist look like?

In April, the Institute of Physics (IoP) released the results of a survey of their membership, entitled ‘What does a Physicist Look Like?’ The results represent 13% of IoP members, which doesn’t sound like many, but interestingly the age profile mirrors the known profile of the membership. Even more interestingly, 44% of respondents were under 29(…)

Untold Stories – Setting the Record Straight

Our network of ScienceGrrl members runs to over 400 nationwide. Where possible, we link our members with local chapters, headed up by enthusiastic chapter leads. Chapters provide opportunities for informal networking, peer support, and grass-roots activism and public engagement, often in partnership with local initiatives. This post is the second of a short series by(…)

Revisiting ISSET

ScienceGrrl began by producing a 2013 calendar showcasing the real work of a diverse mix of women in STEM, and some of the funds went towards sending a team from Oaklands School in Tower Hamlets to the Mission Discovery summer school, organised by the ISS Educational Trust. With Tim Peake running a marathon in space(…)

OtotheB : app for girls in STEM and entrepreneurship, brought to you by Stemettes

Our sisters in STEM over at Stemettes have released a fab new app, OtotheB, designed to create a global online platform for girls interested in STEM and entrepreneurship. It is free to download from the Google Play and iTunes stores. It gives girls access to: “Motivation Mondays”: Access to exclusive interviews with inspiring women in STEM, and the chance to(…)

Kicking the Elephant Out of the Room

Our network of ScienceGrrl members runs to over 400 nationwide. Where possible, we link our members with local chapters, headed up by enthusiastic chapter leads. Chapters provide opportunities for informal networking, peer support, and grass-roots activism and public engagement, often in partnership with local initiatives. This post is the first in a short series by Sarah Hughes, our(…)

Eleni Charalambous – a passion for science that keeps on growing

It’s British Science Week, and many of our members are busy sharing their love of science with the world, and particularly young people who are considering their strengths and abilities and beginning to decide of the type of career they may wish to pursue. It’s natural that those who are so enthusiastic about their scientific work will quietly  –(…)

Science, parenting, and resisting easy answers

Today, to mark International Women’s Day, I took part in an event organised by the University of Manchester’s Faculty of Life Sciences entitled “Becoming the Best”. I joined a panel discussion in which 5 women with STEM degrees talked about their career paths and what had helped them along the way, then took questions from the(…)

Alison Diaper – on Brain Stimulation and True Inspiration

Alison Diaper is at the forefront of the NHS, quietly but confidently working behind the scene to improve our scientific knowledge. She is studying a range of drugs including hypnotics, anxiety inhibitors, antidepressants and drugs that inhibit pain. She is also working to improve deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapies and systems.  In this interview with ScienceGrrl’s Jessica Simpson, Alison takes some(…)

UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2016

The United Nations designated 11th February the International Day of Women and Girls in Science. We joined with our colleagues all over the world via social media to celebrate, invited you to join in…and my word, you did! The hashtag associated with this initiative, #womeninSTEM, was trending as the second most popular topic on Twitter(…)

Celebrating National Women in Engineering Day

Celebrating National Women in Engineering Day

Our lives rely on good engineering. In fact, it’s probably a mark of really good engineering that you don’t really notice it – things just work, and intuitively so. Regrettably, engineers also tend to fade into the background, their innovation, creativity and technical skills going largely unrecognised. Yesterday, we marked National Women in Engineering Day by sharing the stories of(…)

Tim Hunt – ScienceGrrl responds

For the last week, discussions around women in science in the UK have largely centred on remarks made on Monday 8th June by Sir Tim Hunt, at the World Conference of Science Journalism, as part of a speech he gave during a lunch sponsored by female Korean scientists and engineers: “Let me tell you my trouble with(…)